One of the most exciting things about planning a wedding is the fact that you get to do it your own way! Whether that means including ties to where you met, having a non-traditional ceremony, or incorporating your heritage. We absolutely love capturing the details of each and every wedding because that’s what makes them so special.

We recently had the pleasure of photographing Brad & Maggie’s wedding in Pinehurst. Maggie’s family is Polish and we loved how they incorporated some Polish traditions into their wedding day!

It is still very common for Polish weddings to be held in a Catholic church with traditional vows. It is considered good luck to get married in a month that contains an “R.” In Polish, these months are March, June, August, September, October, and December. Generally these months are full of weddings since they are thought to bring good luck to the couple.

After the ceremony, it is customary to have an exit from the church. In Poland, coins are thrown at the bride and groom as they exit. Brad & Maggie chose a modern twist on this, with a bubble exit.

One of the most common Polish traditions, is to start the reception by the parents of the bride and groom presenting them with the “necessities” for their life together. This includes bread, salt, water, and vodka. The bread is symbolic of the couple never knowing hunger and the salt is to remind them that life is full of difficulty and how important it is to learn to cope with that. For the bride and groom’s first toast, they are presented with two shot glasses. One contains water while the other contains vodka. It is said that whoever choses the shot of vodka is who “wears the pants” in the relationship.

This is really when the fun begins. It is standard for Polish weddings to be 12 hours long and have a new meal every 3 hours.

In a very traditional Polish wedding, at midnight there would be a ceremony, Oczepiny, where the bride takes off her veil and cut her hair, symbolizing the transition from youth to her future as a woman. This tradition has become common, not necessarily during the wedding reception, but a lot of ladies chose to do a “post-wedding chop” and cut a significant length off their hair following their wedding day.

Similar to the tradition of a bouquet and garter toss, in Poland, the bride will throw her veil and the groom will throw his tie. It holds the same thought that, whoever catches the veil and tie will be the next to get married.

If a 12 hour wedding doesn’t sound exhausting enough, there is normally a party the next day too! It is said to be more laid-back and just an excuse to drink the vodka leftover from the wedding reception.

Are you planning on incorporating any of your family’s traditions into your wedding? We’d love to hear what you have planned!

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